MY HINTERBERG QUILT FRAME

MY HINTERBERG QUILT FRAME: People ask me frequently about my quilt frame. I love this frame and am very proud of it. I purchased this frame in the spring of 1990. It is rock maple. The website for Hinterberg is: https://www.hinterberg.com/default.aspx

The bars are 92-93″ long and it can be dismantled to transport or to move around at home. It also has a tilt feature but I like to use it flat. I love having my hands free. It is also nice not to have the quilt on my lap (like with a hoop). I have had 6 people quilting on it at one time.

My Hinterberg Quilting Frame
The frame is empty because I just removed the quilt from it.

I admit this frame looks used, but it works just as well now as it did when it was new. And the frame is used. Before I take out a quilt, the quilt to go into it for quilting is ready and waiting. The frame is never sitting empty.

The ratchet system that keeps the bars (and quilt) tight.
There are 4 ratchets to keep the bars (and quilt) tight

This frame is so easy to adjust, tighten, or even tilt.

Nuts and bolts to adjust frame.
Nuts & Bolts to adjust frame

The frame I used before this was simply 4 (1″ x 4″) boards with c-clamps that was held up at the corners on chairs. The quilt was tacked into the frame. It was big and bulky but did the job of holding the quilt tight.

My husband took time to put a double layer of duck cloth on this frame (when new) with tacks. I pin the quilt to the fabric.

Fabric that quilt is pinned to while in frame.

So here is my Hinterberg quilt frame with a quilt in it. The quilt is tight and without wrinkles or puckers. A joy to quilt this way.

Quilt in my Hinterberg Quilt Frame

My kids were teenagers before it really hit them that a quilt frame is probably not standard living room furniture. They all can hand quilt and have quilted at this frame.

In my opinion, one of the nicest things about a quilt frame is the room to have a quilting bee. I try to do one once a year with other quilters just for the fellowship and joy of being with other quilters.

Suggestion

While I definitely prefer to have an actual quilt frame, it is not for everyone. Some people prefer a different type of frame, or a hoop. Some prefer just to wad it up in their hands and quilt. Find what works for you, and just enjoy the process of hand quilting.

Clip art of woman at quilt frame
Source: Google clip art

Some other quilts I have hand quilted on this frame:

https://indianaquilter40.com/grandma-came-for-christmas-hand-quilted/

https://indianaquilter40.com/queen-annes-star-whole-cloth-quilt-hand-quilted/

https://indianaquilter40.com/maine-row-quilt/

GRANDMA CAME FOR CHRISTMAS (hand quilted)

GRANDMA CAME FOR CHRISTMAS – The last time grandma and I went fabric shopping together, she told me that I didn’t have to buy scraps (I was buying 1/4 yd. pieces of Christmas fabric) because she had plenty and would be glad to share.

"Grandma Came For Christmas" hanging on a fence.
Photo taken in 1998 before the county fair.

I pieced the center 16 Log Cabin blocks in 1988 while living in West Germany. The red center block is 2.5″ and the logs are 1.5″ in width when cut. I used green and red scraps with muslin. I put them away because I wasn’t sure what to actually make with them.

At some point, I added two borders around the center blocks, with the red border being 3″ cut and the cream muslin border being 4.5″ cut.

On one of my trips back home, Grandma and I went fabric shopping – many of those 1/4 yard pieces got put into the piano key border which is 10″ wide (cut). The final outside border was from Grandma’s fabric collection and is 6.5″ cut.

I would piece on it, then put it away for several years (1988 – 1997). Grandma never saw the completed top or quilt since she died in 1996. I hand quilted this in 1997. The binding is also hand finished.

Finished size is 80″ x 80″.

"Grandma Came for Christmas" - the hand quilting.
Some of the hand quilting. Location was front of SCPL, Sullivan, IN

In 1998 this quilt got a blue ribbon at the county fair. Here are the comments from the judges:

"Grandma Came for Christmas" - judges comments.

Grandma was a huge part of my life growing up. She encouraged me to quilt and be anything I wanted. She insisted on good grades in school and finishing high school because she only was able to complete up through 10th grade. I miss her still. Her wisdom and compassion are something that are missing in our current world.

“Grandma Came for Christmas” is brought out every year at Christmas to be displayed, cuddled in, and talked about. It is a great way to remember a super important person in my life.

Quilters, your quilts can have a story or be in memory of some important person in your life. Quilts can have funny or sad stories. Don’t forget to pass the stories on with the quilts.

"Grandma Came for Christmas" - the colors are still as bring in 2019 as in 1998.
The colors are still as bright in Dec. 2019 as they were in 1998. Location of photo was at front of SCPL, Sullivan, IN

Another log cabin quilt I made:

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2019/08/purple-without-apology-log-cabin.html

More Christmas quilts I made:

https://indianaquilter40.com/a-road-trip-and-beautiful-quilts

QUEEN ANNE’S STAR WHOLE CLOTH QUILT (hand quilted)

I love to hand quilt. However, but I am choosy about which ones I spend the time on to hand quilt. I found the pre-marked top and had to quilt it knowing this quilt, Queen Anne’s Star Whole Cloth quilt, would be worth the many hours to complete.

Blue hand quilted Queen Anne's Star Whole Cloth quilt.

The finished size is 92″ x 100″.

Queen Anne’s Star Whole Cloth quilt has a medium blue linen top, wool batting, and the pre-printed muslin back. I put the pre-marked side up in the quilt frame so I can see the design to do the hand quilting. This one only has 5 spools of quilting thread in it, unlike the Welsh Beauty (https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2009/09/welsh-beauty-wholecloth-quilt.html) which had 7+.

Package label for Queen Anne Star whole cloth quilt.
Packaging with pre-printed top

I used Hobbs wool batting (http://www.hobbsbatting.com/products/hobbs-tuscany-batting/hobbs-tuscany-100-wool-batting/ ) for this quilt and it was so easy to stitch. This batting still has the lanolin in it, and even with the extra weight of the linen it quilted so easy.

Binding is the same blue linen as the top (2.5″ strips). I folded the strip in half and ironed. It was then sewed down by machine on one side and finished by hand on the other. I also hand cross stitched tag gives my initials, place, date (2009) and sewed it to the muslin back at a corner.

I have a quilt frame that is in the living room (wonderfully cozy in winter as the wood stove is in the same room). My kids were teenagers before they realized that a quilt frame is not standard living room furniture – it had always just been part of their life.

Quilted feathers on Queen Anne's Star whole cloth quilt.
Feathers from blue linen side.
Muslin side that was pre-marked for Queen Anne's Star whole cloth quilt.
This side was pre-marked – beautiful design.
White muslin side of Queen Anne's Star whole cloth quilt showing hand quilting stitches.
More of the hand quilted design
Quilted feathers in Queen Anne's Star Whole Cloth quilt.
Quilted feathers
Queen Anne's Star whole cloth quilt hanging over laundry line.
Looks and feels wonderful.

I love the look and texture of hand quilting. Just as good is a beautiful and useful finished quilt.

Another whole cloth project that I did:

https://indianaquilter40.com/queens-crown-1/

QUEEN’S CROWN #1 (Small quilt with beads – hand quilted)

I wanted to try my hand at beading for embellishment with hand quilting and this pre-printed square in the design named Queen’s Crown was the perfect choice.

Small hand quilted squares with beads embellishing it.
Front side. The beads really embellish the hand quilting.

Supplies:

  • One pre-printed 18″ block from  https://www.quiltingstencils.com/ 
  • 22″ piece of muslin for backing
  • Batting to fit (I used a leftover piece)
  • Glass beads in your choice of color (I used gold/yellow)
  • Quilting thread (I used dark green color)
  • Binding fabric (I used dark green cotton)

I thread basted this very closely in a bright thread that would not blend in to the background.  I found it easier to roll the fabric up in my hand then to use a hoop or small frame. I started the quilting in the center and worked on it in quarters. I used shorter lengths of quilting thread (about 15″) than normal because it was easy to get the thread caught in the beads that were already quilted on.  

Muslin backing clearly shows hand quilting.
Reverse. Notice how even the stitching is…..even where the beads are.

The beads are quilted on – every time the needle came up through the top, I put a bead on the needle tip and I then completed that quilting stitch. Time consuming, but makes for a beautiful finished project. The texture as I run my hand across the top is a mix of soft and hard.

The binding is a simple solid green that matches the front of the small quilt.

When I completed the small quilt, I washed it by hand and laid it between two dark towels and allowed to dry flat.

I display this one at Christmas.

MAINE ROW QUILT

Row quilt featuring pine trees, birds, houses, leaves, fish, and mountains.

This Maine Row Quilt is beautiful !!! I completed the hand quilting on it in July of this year.  The top was done by my good quilting buddy (SB) of Caribou, ME. I believe she said the pattern was done by a local guild member up there.

SB had started quilting it, and decided to move onto another project so I got to complete the hand quilting. It was so much fun to quilt because each row was different so the quilting design changed with each row. I put in 182 yards of quilting to finish it for her.

Several people saw it at my home in the quilt frame while I was working on it and we all agreed that it was a truly beautiful quilt (even without my hand stitches in it).

A close up of the bird  and house rows.

The back is a beautiful print of brown bears: 

Backing is a bear print.
A larger view of the entire backing.

The finished size was 88″ x 90″. 

I returned it to her unbound so that is something SB will do over the winter when the snow is flying thick in northern Maine.

I already have so many ideas for quilts, but if I can convince her to loan me the pattern, I may make a Maine Row Quilt for myself.

CELTIC KNOT PILLOWS (hand quilted and embellished with beads)

Mixing large quilts with smaller projects is fun and allows me to have several projects going at the same time. I intended to only make one of these Celtic pillows, but somehow a single project morphed into two separate projects. They started with the purchase of some historical looking metallic trim that I hand sewed small white beads within the design. The hand quilting and embellished trim really made for a one of a kind item.

The navy blue fabric was silk and made for easy hand quilting. I drew the design with a white chalk pencil using a stencil. The I carefully machine sewed the trim to the fabric – I had to be careful to go slowly so I did not catch on the beads. I finished the back using the envelope method (see below) and off this one went to an auction.

Navy blue silk pillow with beaded trip and quilted Celtic knot.
Complete and ready to go to the auction !

The burgundy pillow was also silk fabric and again hand quilted so easily. This one was a gift for a local woman who helped me sew some clothing (in my opinion, complicated compared to quilting). The method was the same for both pillows.

Burgandy silk pillow with beaded trim and hand quilted Celtic knot.

The pillows were sewn together and finished with the envelope method. See: https://www.domesticimperfection.com/how-to-make-envelope-closure-pillow/.

These two pillows were made during 2000 – 2001.

The finished size was 18″ square.