TRIANGLE CHARM QUILT

Triangle Charm Quilt displayed outside.

TRIANGLE CHARM QUILT – So my quilting buddy (SB) and I had the brilliant idea to do some charm quilts using the same fabric packs, but we did different patterns or ways to put the charm pieces together. I simply took my 5″ squares and made half square triangles from them. I added enough “charm” pieces from my own stash to make the top big enough to suit me.

The green sashing and brown posts were out of my stash. I just wanted someplace for my eyes to rest and all those triangles were busy.

I pieced the Triangle Charm Quilt top during March to May 2002. It was fun, and it was fun to work with some different fabrics I would not have bought otherwise.

Clip art - triangles

I kept track of the charms by keeping the fabrics in baggies by main color. Since the point of “charm quilts” is to only have one piece of each fabric in a quilt you will want to find a way to know what fabrics you have already used.

The definition I found for charm quilts “…when quilters make a charm quilt, no fabric is used more than one time in the quilt“.

This was machine quilted in May or June 2002 by RLM.

Finished size is 83″ x 82″.

Other charm quilts:

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2011/08/2000-millennium-charm-quilt.html

https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/how-to-make-a-charm-quilt-4145708

I encourage you to do one charm quilt in your quilting journey. They can be as simple or complicated as you want, but it is a good excuse to use fabrics you would not normally use.

Clip art - triangles

FRENCH COUNTRY LIFE

I pieced French Country Life in early 2013. I collect toile fabrics but can’t bare to cut them up for piecing. Plus they are so busy it is hard to work larger pieces of them into a quilt. So I decided to be “brave” and just cut up a piece of toile to go in this quilt.

Blue and yellow French Country Life

Many of the yellow and blue fabrics of the nine patches are reproductions of historic prints. Combined with the toile, I thought it would make a really historic looking quilt, especially if I hand quilted it.

I am going to admit that I didn’t measure correctly (a good reminder to measure twice and cut once) and the quilt ended up to big for my hand quilting frame.

The flip side of it being to big for my hand quilting frame is that I simply love the colors. It has a real “old world” feel and look to it. I can and have put it on the bed back side up for a different look.

French Country Life was machine quilted in an all-over wave design by RLM in May 2013, and it took me until Dec. 2013 to get the binding and tag done.

I made the binding from left over pieces of blue and yellow bindings from previous quilts.

The top is cottons, it has a poly batting and a blue/cream floral backing.

Backing and quilting design

The finished size is 102″ square.

Even if there are mistakes in your quilts, finish them. If you are happy with the end product – enjoy the quilt, show if off, and tell it’s story. If you are not happy with it, complete and give to a family member who does like it. Or donate it within your community. Quilts are comforting and snuggly even with mistakes.

More ideas for nine patch quilts. Also toile fabric:

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2011/12/nine-patch.html

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2011/12/nine-patch_17.html

https://indianaquilter40.com/collecting-toile-fabric-how-i-use-them-in-quilts/

SUGGESTIONS TO HELP YOUR MACHINE QUILTER

The gentleman who does my machine quilting always has a list of quilts to quilt and tells me when I drop off a quilt how much he enjoys quilting the quilts I bring to him because they are well made and he doesn’t have to struggle to get them quilted. I asked him for some suggestions to help a machine quilter do a great job on your quilt.

Clip art - machine quilted leaves and vine.

His suggestions to help a machine quilter:

  • Pre-wash all the fabric, both in the top and backing.
  • Use proper tension on your sewing machine so the seams are strong and will not start to come apart during the machine quilting process.
  • Use good quality fabrics and sewing thread in your top.
  • Have consistent seams throughout the quilt top.  Do not make smaller than quarter inch seams because they will start to unravel and come apart.
  • Iron the seams as you sew, and the quilt will be (more) straight.
  • If supplying the batting, buy good quality (he prefers Warm & Natural or something similar). Ask your quilter for his/her preferred batting to work with.
  • Make sure your backing is at least 4” bigger than the top on all sides.
  • Know what kind of quilting design and color of thread before he/she starts on your quilt.
  • Your good quality supplies and workmanship plus the machine quilting will make for a quilt you both are happy with when it is complete.
Clip art of machine quilted loops.

You put many hours into making a quilt.  Take time to complete it correctly.  Snuggle up and enjoy – you have earned it.

Happy Stitching.

Clip art of machine quilting - stipple design.

Here are two quilts he machine quilted for me. I request stippling much of the time.

https://indianaquilter40/prayerful-leader-a-george-washington-quilt/

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2019/07/windmill-blades-one-patch-quilt.html