THE ANTIQUE HONEYCOMB QUILT

THE ANTIQUE HONEYCOMB QUILT

The Antique Honeycomb Quilt was a wonderful find during a visit to an antique shop in Farmersburg, IN during 1997. The top was in a pile of other antique tops back in a dark corner. I paid $15 for it, and happily took it home.

This quilt pattern is a bit different than “normal” because the honeycombs are more rectangular than hexagon.

I compared the fabrics to some other quilts I had. And did some research, including a visit with my aunt who specializes in antique quilts. We both decided it was probably made in the very early 1900’s. The range of fabrics is from the 1860’s to 1900.

Some of the browns are faded and starting to shred.

Brown fabric that is shredding.
Brown fabric that is shredding.

Please note that this quilt is not a charm quilt where each fabric is different. It is scrap with lots of repeated fabrics. Someone using what they had on hand at the time.

A note on old fabric:

The antique honeycomb quilt top really called out to me for attention and care. I very carefully and gently washed (really soaked) it in the bathtub (see Method 2 of this link). I did not wring it out or agitate it in any way, but there were problems even with this.

Some of the fabrics that were intact prior to washing started shredding. The flip side is that some of the fabrics stood up to the water just fine, and looked brighter.

Fragile old fabric is something to be aware of if you like antique textiles of any sort. The condition of the fabric will determine if it is for show or use.

Some basic research shows that if any metal was used in the dying or dye setting of a fabric, the fabric is much more likely to shred or deteriorate with time. This seems to occur more in the time period of the mid 1800s to early 1900s.

To hand quilt or not:

Even with some of the pieces shredding, I decided to hand quilt it. There are two reasons for this: I could keep the tension of the quilt frame loose enough to quilt but not put stress on the fabric. The top called out to be completed into a quilt.

This quilt had no border, and I chose to leave it the original size of 68″ x 74″.

Here is the antique looking fabric for the backing.

Backing fabric of the antique honeycomb quilt.
Backing

The hand quilting is a simple outline around each piece. I simply “eye-balled” the quilting. It looks uniform enough that I have been asked what I marked it with.

THE ANTIQUE HONEYCOMB QUILT

A simple solid red binding completed the quilt.

Most quilts that I make are intended to be used. This one is only for display. It looks very homey and comfortable.

Some quilters would replace the shredded pieces with reproduction fabric, but I chose to leave them there. It adds to the antique look and feel of this unusual quilt.

This quilt gets many comments from people who like antiques, and other quilters. It is an unusual block, the various fabrics, the backing, the hand stitching all combine to make for a conversation starter.

Honeycomb pieces.

Would I do it again?

I honestly do not know if I would take the time and care to hand quilt an antique quilt top again. This one spoke to me and I paid attention. It is a source of happiness for me every time I look at it.

The moral to this is to follow your heart when making a quilt. Enjoy the process. Pick fabrics and colors you enjoy. Use a technique you enjoy. There is no right or wrong to making a quilt for yourself.

Make today amazing
Source: Bing clip art
PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN

A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN
Source: Bing clipart

I have always been ready to travel when the opportunity arises. Quilting and travel seem to fit together fine. So I am a quilter on the road again.

The hubby and I took a few days off to escape north to see my sister, her family, and any other family who showed up in MN. The plan was to make the drive each way a two day trip with overnights in the Wisconsin Dells.

Peaceful, quiet time…

The other part of the plan was simply to relax on the lake, enjoy no schedule, and have a great visit. The trip was great and the plans worked out fine.

The cabin deep in the north woods of MN.
The cabin deep in the north woods of MN
View of the lake from the cabin.
View of the lake from the cabin.
A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN
Time on the lake
Peaceful view
Peaceful view

Quilting by the lake

I am still dealing with a problem shoulder so chose a small project that is very mobile. It is also great to just pick up, work on, and put down. No stress.

All the fabric pieces in the small project bag was cut out prior to the trip. The bag also had needles, thread, and small scissors. This makes for keeping everything together, and does not take up much room in the suitcase.

A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN
Quilting project on this trip.
20 completed flower blocks
20 completed flower blocks
Muslin backing and paper removed from flower block
Muslin backing and paper removed from flower block

Fabric shopping to complete the trip

On the return trip, we made a stop in Hutchinson, MN. Hubby headed for the DQ down the block while I did a quick shopping spree at the wonderful store “Quilt Haven on Main”. If you are up that way, make time to stop at this fun fabric store.

Ok, I really don’t need any fabric, but I picked up a few pieces anyway.

Old timey prints
Old timey prints
A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN
Just fun prints.

A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN…

Travel, peace and quiet, and quilting can go hand in hand. If you have a chance to do so please take the time away from your regular life and just enjoy. Pick a project that travels easy and work on it while relaxing.

Happy quilting.

Happy quilting. Make today amazing.
Source: Google clip art
PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

DONATED BABY QUILTS TO THE LOCAL CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTER

DONATED BABY QUILTS TO THE LOCAL CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTER

I am a big believer in giving back to my community. Here are six simple donated baby quilts to the local crisis pregnancy center that I made. As I make these quilts, they get donated in batches of 6 – 12 to two local pregnancy centers.

The blocks are a mix of flannel and cotton with the batting being scraps left over from my own projects. The backing is usually a flannel or child print cotton. They are tied with yarn. People know that I make many of these annually so many of the supplies are donated to me for this purpose.

Supplies For the Donated baby quilts:

Nine 9.5” cotton or flannel squares (3 rows of 3 squares each)

Batting

Bright colored yarn

Backing fabric (flannel or cotton – 1.25 yard)

At a minimum they should be tied at each corner and in the center of each block. They could be machine quilted easily in straight lines.

I do a self binding by trimming the batting even with the top, and then trimming the back to 2″ on each side larger than the top/batting. Fold the over hang in half once (so now 1″ wide all around quilt) and sew down as binding.

DONATED BABY QUILTS TO THE LOCAL CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTER

If using fleece as the backing, when self binding trim to 1″ and zig-zag stitch down. I have found if using fleece for the backing, I do not use batting.

Please remember that these donated baby quilts for the local crisis pregnancy center are meant to be loved to death, so make them well and colorful.

Reach out to others:

If you ask or look around your own community, there are people or places who would love to receive warm and cuddly quilts. These are also a simple way to teach people basic sewing skills.

In the past, I have used these quilts to teach basic sewing and giving skills to a group of teen girls at church. It was a fun way to learn and for them to socialize as well. Currently I am making the donated baby quilts alone as the girls have all left for college, and none of the current teen girls are interested in sewing.

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2015/02/10-crisis-pregnancy-quilts.html

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2014/09/19-crisis-pregnancy-center-quilts.html

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

CHRISTMAS IN PARIS 1985

Christmas in Paris 1985

We lived in Germany for five years during the 1980’s. The short version of this story is that I lost the coin flip and we spent Christmas in Paris 1985 (instead of Rome).

It was certainly exciting to be in Paris, and we saw all the tourist places during those five days (Arc de Triomphe, Norte Dame, the Louvre Museum, Versailles, Eiffel Tower, etc.).

Not to mention walking around downtown and getting lost. Or that my husband got food poisoning. It was a memorable once-in-a-lifetime experience (he is rolling his eyes right now).

Never did I think of making a quilt as a keepsake for the trip – I had lots and lots of photos that are still fun to look at.

However, I was in a fabric store recently, the Rockin Bobbin https://www.rockinbobbinquiltshop.com/ and found some really pretty Paris themed fabrics.

Clip art of Eiffel Tower

The light bulb went off – a quilt to commemorate the Christmas in Paris 1985 trip would be fun so I picked up several different pieces of the Paris fabric.

After washing and ironing the fabric, I cut it up without thinking to take photos before cutting. However, here a close up of a piece that is used as an alternate block for the quilt.

Close up of black and white Paris themed fabric

Making the wall hanging:

I went through my Christmas prints and chose some that were glittery (like Paris, right). The goal was a simple wall hanging so I cut 8″ squares of the Paris fabric, and a few glittery Christmas fabrics for a total of 20 squares. I sewed these squares together 4 squares x 5 rows.

A gray stone looking fabric was chosen for between the blocks and the glittery music outer border.

Christmas in Paris 1985 pieced together.
The completed top – Christmas in Paris 1985

The top was easily pieced in a day and is ready to go for machine quilting. The finished size is 41″ x 48″.

The backing is a Paris toile and I will hand cross stitch a pretty tag to put on the back once it is quilted.

I am normally the person taking photos because I am not fond of having my own picture taken. However, here are two photos of a much younger me in Paris during December 20 – 25, 1985.

Photo of Eiffel Tower in Paris, France.
Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France

Life’s events can certainly be commemorated with a quilt, either simple or complex. What life event would you like to commemorate with a quilt?

Christmas in Paris clip art

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

ODE TO VINTAGE CARS

ODE TO VINTAGE CARS
Source: Bing clip art

As I mentioned in the previous post, a current project is a quilt for my nephew. He loves vintage and muscle cars. I am making him an Ode to Vintage Cars quilt for his high school graduation this year. Simple and personal.

I try to do my business locally, and in this case the search for specific fabric took longer than expected. I found so many vehicle fabrics, but most were juvenile looking or were not the right kind of cars. Amazing as it is, I was able to get four vintage car fabrics on my last road trip to the Daviess County, IN Amish community.

My plan is this –

Double bed size made from 10″ squares. The car fabric will be alternated with solid orange fabric. It will be 8 rows across by 9 rows up and down for a total of 72 squares. So 36 orange and 36 car fabric. Can you tell I like to keep my math easy?

Some car fabrics

My thought is to add three separate borders: 2.5″ wide white, 2.5″ orange, and 4″ navy blue with small white stars. The borders will be my ode to my favorite muscle car.

I am aiming for a finished size of 85″ x 95″.

Right now, the rows are sewn together and the top is waiting the borders. I should be able to get the borders added this week. Then it will go off to be machine quilted.

I will add more photos once the quilt is complete.

ODE TO VINTAGE CARS

It should make a young man who loves vintage and muscle cars a happy guy.

Update 06/22/2021:

I just finished the self binding on this quilt, and wanted to add an updated photo and information.

Ode to Vintage Car quilt complete.

This quilt has three borders. The first is white solid, the second is the same orange solid as the alternate blocks, with the outside border being navy with white stars.

The backing is a gray solid flat sheet. For quilting thread I chose gray variegated to blend in with the backing. Batting is a poly/cotton blend.

An all over stipple design was done for the machine quilting.

The completed size is 88″ x 98″ so a bit bigger than the original goal.

Update 7/06/2021:

Nephew is happy with the quilt.
Nephew is happy with the quilt.
ODE TO VINTAGE CARS
On his bed – it looks really good.

My favorite muscle car:

During my teen years in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s, muscle cars were common. I had my favorites – Corvette’s and Nova’s. Then this TV series came on in 1979 named the Dukes of Hazzard. I fell in love hard for the most “magic” muscle car of them all – the General Lee. It was beautiful jumping and it always drove off after a jump.

Coolest vintage car
Source: Google images

I found out the hard way that jumping a muscle car was not smart and very dangerous. A school mate and I ruined his dad’s newly restored Camaro by jumping it on a country road. The moral to that lesson – let the stunt guys drive crazy.

Conclusion:

Easy and personal quilts can be made from any novelty fabric that suits the interests of the recipient. Here’s another idea for a personal quilt that involves vehicles. I also found an unlimited amount of car quilt ideas on Pintrest.

This kind of quilt is simple to make and a joy to receive. Have fun making these for the special people in your life.

In the meantime, I will finish the Ode to Vintage Cars quilt by adding the borders and getting it off to the machine quilter.

Have a great day.

Make today amazing.
Source: Bing clipart

(PINK) FLANNEL ONE PATCH QUILT

Pink Flannel One Patch Quilt hanging on fence.

Today is a snow day here, and the temps mean I am happy to stay inside by the wood stove. I am looking through photos and quilt scrapbooks thinking about all the various quilts I have made over the years. The one pictured above, (PINK) FLANNEL ONE PATCH QUILT, was warm and loved.

(Pink) Flannel One Patch Quilt was never intended to be an heirloom. Yes, some quilts are made as heirlooms, some are made to be used (but not abused) and some are made to be loved to death. The fate of being loved to death is the story of this quilt.

I pieced it from a stack of left over mostly pink flannel blocks in 1994 – 1996. The blocks were cut 8″ square and there is no border. The backing was a pink flannel flat sheet. The “batting” was a worn white cotton sheet. It was tied with yarn.

My daughter (H) was the recipient of this and she also “helped” with the sewing and tying of the quilt. She was so excited about how soft and cuddly it was. She was four years old when we finished it.

We sewed it together so it looked like a pillow case, smoothed it out, and tied it. After that the open fourth side was sewn shut. It was a simple quilt and made to be loved to death.

She still thinks it was wonderful and did use it until it was a ragged mess that was finally thrown away when she went to college. H. has happy memories of the quilt itself and of us working on it together.

Pink Flannel One Patch Quilt

Finished size was 67″ x 80″.

Moral of the story….

The morale of the (Pink) Flannel One Patch Quilt is simply that not all quilts are made to live long lives and be beautiful. Some are made to be used, washed, played on and under, and just generally have a short life span – but the memories produced are for a life time.

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2011/07/homespun-one-patch.html

https://indianaquilter40.com/dog-cat-quilt

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

LEMON DROPS AND BLUEBERRIES QUILT

LEMON DROPS AND BLUEBERRIES QUILT

Want to make a dent in your scrap bin? What about making a simple quilt in your favorite colors? This quilt, Lemon Drops and Blueberries, will do either or both. Plus it was fun and easy.

This quilt can easily be made with 3″ wide strips and strip pieced together if you have yardage or bigger scraps. However, I was working with small scraps and cut individual 3″ blocks.

Starting step for Lemon Drops and Blueberries Quilt

Using the same idea from Pintrest as I did for a previous quilt, Simply Squares (indianaquilter40.com/simple-squares-quilt) I cut out stacks of 3″ squares from the scrap bin. I narrowed my color choices to blues and yellows.

Blue and yellow 3" squares for the quilt blocks.

For this quilt, I made the blocks 6 squares long by 6 squares across. I use the foot on my machine for the seam line and it is a bit bigger than a quarter inch. My blocks turned out to be 15″ square.

Rows together to make blocks for the Lemon Drops and Blueberries quilt.

I decided to make the quilt five blocks across and six blocks long (30 blocks total), plus the sashing and posts. So I did not loose count, I pinned the finished blocks together in stacks of 10 blocks.

30 completed blocks for the Lemon Drops and Blueberries quilt.

Adding the posts and sashing to Lemon Drops and Blueberries Quilt

The blocks finished at 15″ square which is the length I cut the sashing. The sashing is 3″ wide.

By sewing sashing, block, sashing, block and repeating, I was able to sew the six rows of five blocks together quickly.

Then I sewed the post, sashing, post, sashing, etc. together until it was the length I wanted to match the block row.

Close up of blocks, posts, and sashings for this quilt.

Adding the borders to the Lemon Drops and Blueberries Quilt

The only fabric that is not scraps is the border on my quilt top. I cut it 4″ wide.

Border fabric for Lemon Drops and Blueberries quilt.

I sewed the top and bottom borders on, then ironed. After that I sewed the side borders on and ironed.

Close up of border fabric sewn on quilt.

The top is complete !! The size is 94″ x 110″.

Remember that this quilt can be adjusted several ways:

The square size can be made larger or smaller than the 3″ squares that I used if you desire. This will enable you to utilize the fabric you have.

Or the number of squares sewn into a block can be adjusted to more or less based on the needs for your own quilt. I used 6 blocks across and long (so 36 squares in each block).

Even the posts and sashings can be narrower or wider than the 3″ I used.

The border can be easily wider or narrower based on the size of quilt needed.

Completed blocks for this quilt.

Other ideas for using simple squares and scraps to make a quilt:

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2009/10/leftovers.html

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2010/06/wonderful-fall-colors.html

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2011/12/1930s-one-patch.html

Happy Stitching and have a wonderful day.

clip art - make today amazing.

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE THE PROPERTY OF INDIANAQUILTER40 UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

MILLENNIUM QUILTS – LOOKING BACK 20 YEARS

Free clip art: 2000 with stars in blue
Source: Free clip art on Google

Millennium Quilts – looking back 20 years. Were you quilting 20 years ago? If so, do you remember if you had a special quilt project for the year 2000? I went through a pile of quilts last week that needed to be aired out and refolded. In the pile were two millennium quilts that I made.

When I found the millennium quilts and realized 20 years have passed – wow!! The time is just flying by day by day. So many changes, both in my quilting and personally.

As far as my quilting, the past 20 years have been mostly fun. I have tried more hand applique. Using the rotary cutter has become second nature and I learned after one serious accident to keep my fingers firmly on the ruler. Combining colors and designs of fabric no longer scares me. I rarely feel the need to respond to the question “how many quilts have you made? – it is not a contest. Quilting gives me joy and a sense of peace, plus I can actually enjoy and see the finished item, which is not something visible in my daily job.

The making of my millennium quilts – looking back 20 years

Judy Martin, a well known quilter, says that millennium quilts… “made to celebrate the year 2000, were made with exactly 2000 patches. Sometimes…cut from different fabric, just like a charm quilt.” https://www.pinterest.com/judymartinquilt/charm-quilts-millennium-quilts/

In the late 1990’s I saw ads in quilting magazines from people all over the world who wanted to trade 3″ squares to make millennium quilts. I thought it would be a fun challenge to make a quilt with 2000 different fabrics. So I traded, and traded…….. Eventually I traded 10,000 three inch squares with other quilters all over the world. Each envelope was so exciting to open and see what new treasures were inside.

The squares came from all over Europe, Canada, and the USA. There were even a few packages from Africa, India, Japan, and South America. I certainly never thought about all the different fabrics that were available the world over. This project really opened my eyes to quilting being international – not just American.

In fact, the post mistress of our little town was so excited about all the places these envelopes came from that I would open them right there so she could see what they contained. The selection of fabrics was amazing. Ultimately, I ended up with 43 repeats out of the 10,000 squares traded!! And only one person did not trade back (or maybe the envelope was lost somewhere in the mail system).

2000 Millennium Charm Quilt – looking back 20 years

MILLENNIUM QUILTS - LOOKING BACK 20 YEARS

I cut the 3″ traded squares to 2.5″ simply so they were actually all the same size. If you have quilted any time at all, you know how my 3″ square maybe a bit (or a lot) different than your 3″ square. I have never figured that out, but that is not the point either.

The variety of colors, patterns, and even quality of the cotton was amazing. The squares were kept in plastic bags by color groups. I changed my mind several times about exactly how I would design this millennium quilt – after all, the year 2000 was a big deal (or was supposed to be!).

Finally opting to do 16 square blocks. It was a simple way to double check to make sure there were no duplicates. This way also allowed me to loosely use the squares by color. I didn’t stress over if my planned look for each block turned out differently – frankly I just let myself have fun putting the blocks together.

16 square blocks for charm quilt
More charm squares sewn together for quilt.

Even as I pieced this top together during Jan. to March of 1999, the packages of 3″ squares continued to come in. It seemed that no matter how many I used, there were more to work with.

I finally stopped making the blocks, and added a navy blue border with “2000” in it. Then I added another border down two sides of more blocks. There is one square of the border fabric somewhere in the top so that there are exactly 2000 different fabrics for this millennium quilt.

Quilt border print says "2000" in it.

It was quilted in Nov. 1999 by MG in an all-over cloud design. The final size is 90″ x 98″. The top is all cottons, the batting is polyester, and the backing a queen size flat sheet.

MILLENNIUM QUILTS - LOOKING BACK 20 YEARS
Photo taken 05 2020

2001 Millennium Charm Quilt – looking back 20 years

MILLENNIUM QUILTS - LOOKING BACK 20 YEARS
Photo taken 05 2020

Still using the 2.5″ charm squares, I simply just randomly sewed the medium and dark ones together. I was still getting packages in the mail and at this point just felt overwhelmed at how many different cotton fabrics there were around the world.

Random squares sewn into quilt top.
Random 2.5″ squares sewn together to make quilt top.

I pieced the quilt header “2001” area using the lighter squares as the background and darker ones for the 2001.

Three borders down two sides
These 3 fabric strips were the borders for two sides.

I worked on this quilt on and off during the first half of 2001. In Oct. 2001 it was machine quilted by CM in the loopy design. The backing is a light colored large flat sheet.

Machine quilting in a loopy design.

While the machine quilting was fine, the quilt was not centered on the backing. Truthfully, it really made me angry to work so hard and long on a top to have it treated so disrespectfully by the machine quilter. However, I wanted it completed. So a creative answer to fixing this issue for binding was to simply cut off part of the borders on two sides. It ended up being finished size 92″ x 104″.

MILLENNIUM QUILTS - LOOKING BACK 20 YEARS

Finally

I continued to use the millennium charm squares in other projects as I was able. The squares also got bagged up and “gifted” to other quilters for birthday or Christmas gifts.

I loved the challenge of working with the squares. It was fun, if time consuming, to keep checking for duplicates. My challenge to other quilters is to do a charm quilt of some sort during your quilt journey.

The year 2000 has come and gone. But I have two very special quilts to represent that year and am so glad I did all those exchanges with so many other quilters around the world.

I am so glad that I took the time and challenge to do the millennium quilts. It has been fun over the past week to look back over the past 20 years of quilting – wow. For myself, somehow those millennium quilts were really freeing for quilting in my life. They improved my critical thinking skills (as in how am I going to fix this problem/mistake?). I spend less time thinking about the individual aspects (will this fabric really match?) and more about the whole quilt design. There is also just making the quilts because each one suits me or my current need.

Each quilt you and I do expands our skills and allows us to learn something new about ourselves. Have fun with your quilt making journey.

Other charm quilt ideas:

http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com/2017/10/another-millennium-quilt-goes-home.html

http://crazyquilteronabike.blogspot.com/2017/01/the-new-millennium.html

https://prairiemoonquilts.com/do-you-remember/

https://indianaquilter40.com/triangle-charm-quilt/

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

IN MEMORY OF IRELAND

Irish Shamrock
Source: Google clip art

In Memory of Ireland was meant as a snuggle/lap quilt. I made it for the wonderful couple (A & S G) who are naturalized citizens from Ireland and now own the wonderful motel I stay in annually on the coast of Maine.

In Memory of Ireland quilt

Various green 8″ square (some even have shamrocks or Celtic knots) alternated with white 8″ squares.  The interior three borders were done in the order of the Irish flag: green, orange, white. The borders were each 2.5″.

The outside border was cut 4″ wide and is a navy blue with a green Celtic knot design.

Machine quilted in a large stipple design  by RLM. Self bound.

Finished size is 72″ x 72″.

They were so excited to receive an “American” quilt and say they will treasure it forever.  I hope they use it and enjoy In Memory of Ireland.

Gift quilts don’t have to be complicated to make. They are easy to personalize by doing simple squares and adjusting the size or amount of squares to fit the need. Just use fabrics and colors that are personal to the recipients. They can be tied, machine or hand quilted based on the budget or desire.

clip art of Irish symbols
Source: Google clip art

Here are some other gift quilts that were fun and easy to make:

https://indianaquilter40.com/wedding-quilt-simple-personal/

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2018/05/minnie-mouse.html

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2011/11/one-patch-quilts.html

CRUISE-IN 2013 QUILT

Cruise-In 2013 Quilt
Cruise-In Quilt complete and ready to go to the auction.

CRUISE-IN 2013 QUILT: I made it for the local college campus that had a cruise-in and auction as a fund raiser for diabetes.

I try to look around and find places in my community or area that I can make quilts for directly, or donate for a good cause. I encourage other quilters to do the same.


This was a really fast and fun quilt to make. It was a simple one patch (my go – to design when I need a quick and simple design for a quilt). I spent several evenings of cutting, sewing, and binding.

The car and motorcycle print blocks were alternated with a black and white print that looked like a racing flag. The colors were cheerful and bright. The blocks were 9.5″ and the red border was 4″.

clip art - red car



Machine quilted by RLM in an all-over stipple design.

Finished size was 97″ square.


I was disappointed that they only got $125 for this Cruise-In 2013 Quilt, however, I am glad the money is going for a good cause. All the supplies and labor were donated.

Fun car and motorcycle fabrics

More info on donating quilts:

https://nationalquilterscircle.com/article/10-amazing-places-to-donate-your-quilts/#

https://blog.missouriquiltco.com/quiltingforacause

https://indianaquilter40.com/donated-baby-quilts-to-the-local-crisis-pregnancy-center/