FIRST GRANDBABY QUILT

FIRST GRANDBABY QUILT
Source: Google

I recently spent some time looking at my old blog and walking down “memory lane” of quilts that I did years ago. I thought this quilt “First Grandbaby Quilt” would be a fun one to share. It was simple and made with a lot of love for a wonderful surprise.

Our first (and to date only) grandbaby was a wonderful surprise. Our daughter was and is a planner, and as far as we knew babies were not part of the her life’s plan.

So being a quilter, my mind went into “quilting mode” and what kind of quilt to make for the expected precious little person. The daughter refused to have a sex test done on the baby so any quilt would have to be for either gender.

After much sorting through the stash, I finally decided on cheerful and bright. Some bright scraps, some flower fabrics, some cat fabrics, and a newly purchased piece of Winnie the Pooh fabric for the border.

The grand-daughter arrived as scheduled in March 2015. She was (and is) a precious addition to our family. We are so glad to live only a short distance away which means we are able to babysit a few hours weekly. The years slip by so fast and she is now in kindergarten. She is beautiful just like her mom.

Stork & baby clip art
Source: Google

The First Grandbaby quilt is faded and well used, which is exactly what it should be.

See another easy quilt on this blog.

Completed quilt:

FIRST GRANDBABY QUILT

Remember these are the sizes I used and feel free to adjust to suit your needs.

Finished size is 54″ square.

Center 9 blocks are 10″ square. The strip blocks are 2.5″ wide strips sewn together side to side. Trim to the size you want.

Inside border of cat fabric is 6″ wide.

The outside Winnie the Pooh border is 8″ wide.

Machine quilting by RLM is a medium size stipple.

Binding is self bound with the gray flannel backing being pulled to the front and machine sewn down.

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Make Today Amazing
Source: Bing

ODE TO VINTAGE CARS

ODE TO VINTAGE CARS
Source: Bing clip art

As I mentioned in the previous post, a current project is a quilt for my nephew. He loves vintage and muscle cars. I am making him an Ode to Vintage Cars quilt for his high school graduation this year. Simple and personal.

I try to do my business locally, and in this case the search for specific fabric took longer than expected. I found so many vehicle fabrics, but most were juvenile looking or were not the right kind of cars. Amazing as it is, I was able to get four vintage car fabrics on my last road trip to the Daviess County, IN Amish community.

My plan is this –

Double bed size made from 10″ squares. The car fabric will be alternated with solid orange fabric. It will be 8 rows across by 9 rows up and down for a total of 72 squares. So 36 orange and 36 car fabric. Can you tell I like to keep my math easy?

Some car fabrics

My thought is to add three separate borders: 2.5″ wide white, 2.5″ orange, and 4″ navy blue with small white stars. The borders will be my ode to my favorite muscle car.

I am aiming for a finished size of 85″ x 95″.

Right now, the rows are sewn together and the top is waiting the borders. I should be able to get the borders added this week. Then it will go off to be machine quilted.

I will add more photos once the quilt is complete.

ODE TO VINTAGE CARS

It should make a young man who loves vintage and muscle cars a happy guy.

My favorite muscle car:

During my teen years in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s, muscle cars were common. I had my favorites – Corvette’s and Nova’s. Then this TV series came on in 1979 named the Dukes of Hazzard. I fell in love hard for the most “magic” muscle car of them all – the General Lee. It was beautiful jumping and it always drove off after a jump.

Coolest vintage car
Source: Google images

I found out the hard way that jumping a muscle car was not smart and very dangerous. A school mate and I ruined his dad’s newly restored Camaro by jumping it on a country road. The moral to that lesson – let the stunt guys drive crazy.

Conclusion:

Easy and personal quilts can be made from any novelty fabric that suits the interests of the recipient. Here’s another idea for a personal quilt that involves vehicles. I also found an unlimited amount of car quilt ideas on Pintrest.

This kind of quilt is simple to make and a joy to receive. Have fun making these for the special people in your life.

In the meantime, I will finish the Ode to Vintage Cars quilt by adding the borders and getting it off to the machine quilter.

Have a great day.

Make today amazing.
Source: Bing clipart

LOG CABIN IN THE FALL WOODS (another log cabin quilt)

LOG CABIN IN THE FALL WOODS (another log cabin quilt)

Fall is my favorite season and the only one I really decorate for. I believe that is one reason I go to Maine every September – the colors are so brilliant – the blue sky, the leaves, the ocean water.  I thought it would be fun to make a log cabin quilt in fall colors. Here is the start of my “Log Cabin in the Fall Woods” quilt.

Red and gold leaves for LOG CABIN IN THE FALL WOODS
Stock photo from Pexels

Basic directions:

I started to make a fall themed log cabin quilt from my fabric stash. The goal being to not buy any fabric to make this quilt top. It was not hard to find the right red, orange and purple scraps and cut them into the correct sizes and shapes:

4″ center squares (dark red)

2.5″ strips (purple and orange)

Purple and orange strips

When constructing the blocks, I only did two rounds instead of my normal three. When sewing two of the sides of the block are in one color (orange) and the other two in another color (purple). There is a total of 36 blocks to make this square quilt, or six rows by six rows. I like keeping the math simple.

36 Completed blocks

I cut many strips to start and ended up cutting more to complete the blocks. That really is fine, I am trying to use up scraps.

36 blocks done:

When the 36 blocks were complete, I set them together in what is called the Sunshine & Shadow setting or the Dark & Light setting. Whatever the name, it gave a different look to the purple and orange blocks. I only recently realized how many ways the log cabin blocks can be put together to make designs.

36 blocks sewn together for LOG CABIN IN THE FALL WOODS

At this point, the top for “Log Cabin in the Fall Woods” is 68” square and needs a border or borders to complete.  I lost interest and moved to another project. This project got hung on a hanger in the closet to be finished another time.

Adding the borders

I added more of the leftover strips to make the border to finish this quilt top. There are 5 borders to make the quilt the size I want.

Starting closest to the blocks, first border is 4″ in red print. The second border is leftover 2.5″ leftover purple strips. The third border is leftover 2.5″ orange strips. The fourth border is leftover 2.5″ purple strips. The final border is 4″ wide and a leaf print with metallic highlights.

Completed top for Log Cain in the Fall Woods.
Here is the completed top for Log Cabin in the Fall Woods

A completed quilt

The quilt was machine quilted in a large stipple design. The machine quilting was completed in May 2020 by RLM.

Finished size is 88″ square.

The backing is a solid purple sheet.

I did not buy any fabric for the quilt top. It is made of scraps or from fabric pieces already in my stash. Goal reached !!

Backing and machine quilting design.
Backing with quilting design showing.
Completed Log Cabin in the Fall Woods quilt.
Yeah! The completed quilt.

Another fall log cabin quilt – https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2009/10/log-cabin.html

Another log cabin – https://indianaquilter40.com/hot-chocolate-and-peppermint-quilt/

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

The Mystery Quilt Continues

Mystery clip art
Source: Bing clip art

I decided to do the mystery quilt that Bonnie Hunter put out on her blog during late November 2020. My goal was to complete each part as the directions came out every week. Real life put out some bumps and I am behind, so the mystery quilt continues…..

If you missed my previous post on this mystery quilt, please go here. In that post, I showed photos as I completed making parts 1 – 6.

I am not going to give details or sizes because you should to go to Bonnie’s website to get the complete directions. At some point this design will be put into a PDF pattern she will sell.

Fall color leaves
Source: Bing clip art

And the mystery quilt continues…..

Now I am in part 7 which is putting the components from the previous parts into blocks and sashing to complete the top for making the Grassy Creek Mystery Quilt.

The Main Blocks:

The first step in this part was making these Ohio Star blocks to be the center of the main blocks.

Ohio Stars for the center of the mystery quilt blocks.

Then adding the triangle components to the sides.

Adding triangle components to sides.

So the center block is complete. There is still the sashing and secondary blocks to make from the parts.

Main blocks of mystery quilt.

The sashing:

Sewing the gray strips together to make the sashing was easy but to me the most time consuming part of the entire process. For part 7 the red rectangles were added to each long end.

Sashing for mystery quilt blocks.

The final components to put together are the remaining flying geese blocks, HST, and red rectangles into a secondary block. This is where I am as of this morning – still needing to add the yellow and gray HST:

A section of part 7.

When I committed to doing this mystery quilt, I involved another quilter who had never done anything by Bonnie Hunter or a mystery quilt. She was not sure about it but was willing. Her top has been completed for 3 weeks because she had way too much fun using scraps and piecing an unknown design.

That being said, for those of us who get bogged down in a design, someone else just flies through it and is done. Usually other quilters say that I am the one flying through the piecing of a quilt top – not this time.

So….just keep at your project, enjoy, and complete. I have not given up or allowed myself to work on another quilt top. This one will not be a UFO.

(PINK) FLANNEL ONE PATCH QUILT

Pink Flannel One Patch Quilt hanging on fence.

Today is a snow day here, and the temps mean I am happy to stay inside by the wood stove. I am looking through photos and quilt scrapbooks thinking about all the various quilts I have made over the years. The one pictured above, (PINK) FLANNEL ONE PATCH QUILT, was warm and loved.

(Pink) Flannel One Patch Quilt was never intended to be an heirloom. Yes, some quilts are made as heirlooms, some are made to be used (but not abused) and some are made to be loved to death. The fate of being loved to death is the story of this quilt.

I pieced it from a stack of left over mostly pink flannel blocks in 1994 – 1996. The blocks were cut 8″ square and there is no border. The backing was a pink flannel flat sheet. The “batting” was a worn white cotton sheet. It was tied with yarn.

My daughter (H) was the recipient of this and she also “helped” with the sewing and tying of the quilt. She was so excited about how soft and cuddly it was. She was four years old when we finished it.

We sewed it together so it looked like a pillow case, smoothed it out, and tied it. After that the open fourth side was sewn shut. It was a simple quilt and made to be loved to death.

She still thinks it was wonderful and did use it until it was a ragged mess that was finally thrown away when she went to college. H. has happy memories of the quilt itself and of us working on it together.

Pink Flannel One Patch Quilt

Finished size was 67″ x 80″.

Moral of the story….

The morale of the (Pink) Flannel One Patch Quilt is simply that not all quilts are made to live long lives and be beautiful. Some are made to be used, washed, played on and under, and just generally have a short life span – but the memories produced are for a life time.

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2011/07/homespun-one-patch.html

https://indianaquilter40.com/dog-cat-quilt

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

NIGHT FLIGHT (or a Flying Geese quilt)

Night Flight complete

Flying Geese is a well known and much loved block among quilters. The pattern is fairly easy to make and can be arranged in other ways beside the traditional Flying Geese quilts. I like darker backgrounds, and thought that “Night Flight” (or a Flying Geese quilt) was a good description of geese flying through a night sky.

According to some books in my personal library, this setting is called “Dutchman’s Puzzle”.

Close up of the flying geese

 All the “geese” in this quilt are Jinny Beyers fabric that I had a stash of. Add solid black fabric for the background. I put a lot of hours into this quilt and it was finished from start to finish in 2008.

Making the “Geese”:

For this quilt, I started with 5″ squares. I drew a line diagonally and then sewed a generous quarter inch on each side of the line to make 2 half square triangle (HST) pieces that I matched and sewed up the center to make each “goose”. Yes this is a time consumptive, but I prefer the accuracy and less stretching of the triangles.

In order to put the design together, I simply laid the pieces out like a magazine photo I had seen.

I used to spend a lot of time working with triangles, but over the past 10 years or so I have gone to using the half square triangle method because of the accuracy, and the way triangles tend (for me at least) to really stretch out of shape, which is means a lot more squaring up to make the blocks fit.

When I show other quilters how to make these Flying Geese blocks, I use this method. The size can be adjusted easily to any size triangles desired.

Another close up of the Flying Geese.

Backing and Machine Quilting:

The backing is not a match to the front at all. In fact, I think it is a super ugly fabric (my own opinion). This fabric was on sale for a great price and is good quality cotton. Another plus is that it was on hand. The budget would not stretch enough to cover another back, and the machine quilting.

Backing of quilt.

Finished size is 100″ square.

Machine quilting is an all over cloud design by RLM in July 2008.

Binding the quilt:

The binding is 2.5″ strips cut from the leftover Jinny Beyers fabrics. It is sewn into a long strip, and ironed in half (1.25″). I machine sewed the raw edge down on the front, flipped it over to the back and hand stitched down.

Here is another view of Night Flight (or a Flying Geese Quilt) completed. The black background makes the “geese” shine.

Night Flight quilt

Challenge yourself:

Pick a simple pattern like this one, and adjust the size to what you would like to work with. Work through the pattern using the photo of the quilt you chose as the guide. Most of all, have fun.

Here are two links to other info on Flying Geese quilts –

https://indianaquilter40.com/the-great-migration-quilt/

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2010/04/flying-geese.html

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

TRIANGLE CHARM QUILT

Triangle Charm Quilt displayed outside.

TRIANGLE CHARM QUILT – So my quilting buddy (SB) and I had the brilliant idea to do some charm quilts using the same fabric packs, but we did different patterns or ways to put the charm pieces together. I simply took my 5″ squares and made half square triangles from them. I added enough “charm” pieces from my own stash to make the top big enough to suit me.

The green sashing and brown posts were out of my stash. I just wanted someplace for my eyes to rest and all those triangles were busy.

I pieced the Triangle Charm Quilt top during March to May 2002. It was fun, and it was fun to work with some different fabrics I would not have bought otherwise.

Clip art - triangles

I kept track of the charms by keeping the fabrics in baggies by main color. Since the point of “charm quilts” is to only have one piece of each fabric in a quilt you will want to find a way to know what fabrics you have already used.

The definition I found for charm quilts “…when quilters make a charm quilt, no fabric is used more than one time in the quilt“.

This was machine quilted in May or June 2002 by RLM.

Finished size is 83″ x 82″.

Other charm quilts:

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2011/08/2000-millennium-charm-quilt.html

https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/how-to-make-a-charm-quilt-4145708

I encourage you to do one charm quilt in your quilting journey. They can be as simple or complicated as you want, but it is a good excuse to use fabrics you would not normally use.

Clip art - triangles

ARE YOU DROWNING IN SCRAPS TOO??

Tub of scraps.

Are you drowning in scraps too??

My 2020 goal was to use as many of my scraps as possible. I made the “executive” decision that any fabric a quarter yard or smaller went from the shelves into the scrap bin back in March when I did a total cleaning of the sewing room.

Fabric scraps.

I took every single piece of fabric off the shelves, went through every drawer, looked in every project box….scary stuff. Some of those things I hadn’t seen in years. So after the dust cleared I decided that even though I already had a list of 12 UFOs I wanted to finish this year – I was going to use as many of the scraps on hand for those projects as possible.

More scraps.

I love all my fabric and that includes the scraps. When I decided that any fabric a quarter yard or smaller went into the scrap bin suddenly there were four bins instead of the previous two. Ugh.

I needed some inspiration on how to deal with the scraps. Pintrest, Facebook, and other quilt blogs were fun to look at. However, I discovered that other quilters have oodles of scraps too and are trying to find ways to use them.

Quarter yard pieces of fabric.

I do not have a scrap organization system:

The scraps are simply thrown in the bins.

I actually like this system for now because I am just taking out handfuls, ironing them, and cutting them into 2.5″ strips, 3″ squares or tumbler shapes. I went to the local dollar store and purchased see through plastic containers with lids for these standard sizes and shapes that I use in my quilt making.

Tumblers.
3" squares.

The continuing challenge:

My personal challenge is to use as many of my scraps up in 2021 as possible. I have been cutting strips, squares, and tumblers as time allowed during 2020 and have several see-through plastic bins of each now.

The thought as I cut up the scraps into standard shapes and sizes that the scraps would be less. Oh so wrong. I think they multiply while in those bins. I started the year with two bins of scraps, and am currently at four.

Challenge yourself:

Are you drowning in scraps too?? For 2021 find quilt designs that will utilize your scraps. Making scrap quilts is fun, and gives a feeling of not being wasteful. If you are tired of your scraps, trade with another quilter to give you some new fabric to work with. Have fun.

Ideas for using scraps:

https://www.redpepperquilts.com/2019/11/japanese-stash-buster-quilt.html

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2019/07/windmill-blades-one-patch-quilt.html

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2015/05/really-scrappy-quilt.html

https://indianaquilter40.com/basketweave-nine-patch

https://indianaquilter40.com/scrap-rectangle-party-quilt

PLEASE NOTE:  ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Lady busy sewing clip art

I Spy Log Cabin Quilt

"I Spy" Log Cabin Quilt

I pieced the 36 blocks for this “I Spy” Log Cabin Quilt while in Maine during September 2017. The scraps are bright, cheerful and fun. The variety of novelty fabrics make it even more interesting – there are all kinds of things to “spy” including: corn on the cob, Snoopy, Minions, cats, rocks, cars, planets, etc. All the fabrics in these blocks came from my scrap bin.

Each center block was a 3″ square sewn into a half square triangle (HST). The fabric strips were 2.5″ wide and as long as I could cut from each scrap. The exception was the outside border which was cut 4″ wide.

The borders also include more strips sewn long-way instead of the usual piano key type border.  This was a quick way to finish up the quilt top and allowed me to use up a few more scraps. (Did you notice the mistake? One side has only one strip of scrap border instead of two like on the other sides).

 This quilt was a Christmas 2017 gift for my daughter and grand-daughter. It makes a fun way to snuggle and play “I Spy” with the various fabrics. The backing was purchased by my daughter and is a peacock theme.

 All cotton fabric and poly batting.

 “I Spy” Log Cabin Quilt was machine quilted by RLM in November 2017 in an all over stipple design.

The binding matched the outer border. Machine sewn to the front and hand sewn on the back of the quilt.

 Finished size is 96″ square.

Log cabin
Source: Bing clip art

My conclusion:

I admit it – I was super slow to figure out how much fun Log Cabin quilts could be. The blocks can be set different ways depending on how the quilter wants the finished quilt to look. Log Cabin quilts can be scrappy or planned or even planned scrappy. There is simply no limit to what can be done with this pattern. Try the Log Cabin design out and see what you come up with. Have fun.

For more ideas about Log Cabin blocks and quilts:

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2019/08/purple-without-apology-log-cabin.html

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2009/10/log-cabin.html

https://www.freequilt.com/logcabin.html

https://indianaquilter40.com/lettuce-be-berry-christmas-quilt/

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Encouraging clip art.

KID PROJECT – BUTTON QUILT

Kid Project: Button Quilt

Kid Project: Button Quilt – We all know children who like to “help” us as we quilt, or want to do something like we are doing.

This is a super easy and non-threatening way to teach basic sewing skills, cutting/dexterity, hand and eye coordination, multiplication, and measuring. Squares, borders, and final size can be adjusted for your child and project.

Daughter (H) was 9 when we did this project – button quilt. I used the rotary cutter to cut 64 blocks. She sewed the blocks together, and added the cat fabric border. I did the binding. She then sewed her favorite buttons (by hand) onto the white squares with thread that matched the buttons.

Kid Project: Button Quilt

We home schooled our kids K – 12, and found out early that quilting was a great way to teach basic math skills. We measure, divide, multiply, subtract, and add to figure out sizes of pieces, blocks, and entire quilts. There is also the colors, and shapes.

Advice for helping the kids in your life quilt: Keep it simple and fun. Let the child pick the fabric and keep the sewing instructions simple.

She entered the Kid Project: Button Quilt in the local county fair (4-H project) and the local quilt show. It got praise and ribbons both places. That is a great confidence builder, especially for a child.

Currently she makes clothes for herself and her daughter. She will help me with all the cutting, ironing, and sewing steps of a quilt top and it makes for a great “girl” day.

Finished size is 28″ square.

Cotton fabric and wool batting. Buttons that were her favorites at the time.

Daughter showing off quilt.
She wanted a photo of herself with the quilt in front of the Christmas tree.

Other kid quilt projects to make

This quilt my son and I made:

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2011/12/four-patch_17.html

Some more ideas for quilting with kids:

https://swoodsonsays.com/easy-quilt-projects-for-kids/

https://www.quiltingcompany.com/kids-are-quilting-5-things-are-learned-teaching-kids-to-quilt-quilty-pleasures-blog/

Clip art - variety of buttons

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.