THE FUSSY CUT BARNYARD QUILT

THE FUSSY CUT BARNYARD QUILT

Sometimes it is fun to walk through the memory lane of quilts and old projects. I recently found my photos of this one, “The Fussy Cut Barnyard Quilt” and thought I would share.

Can you say baa, oink, or moo? When I made this quilt back in 1996-97, I still had a small child at home who thought making animal sounds was great fun.

Some day I will show off my quilt scrapbooks here, but for now let me just say it has been fun to look at them and remember. With my wrist still in a brace, my hand quilting has been a non-happening thing lately. Thankfully therapy is helping, but there is a long way to go.

The Fussy Cut Barnyard Quilt…..

Once upon a time I had a yard of fabric that had primitive farm animals printed on it. You know – horses, cows, pigs, and sheep. They were spaced far enough apart that I could fussy cut them out.

One fine spring day my young daughter ran around the house and yard making farm animal sounds at the top of her lungs. Her brother tried to interest her in quieter, calmer things but she was not going for it.

I had been “playing” with several fabrics to try out fussy cutting. On this day, I was inspired to involve my noisy daughter into “helping” me make this piece of fabric into a quilt.

I measured and cut, daughter gathered the pieces up and laid them out on the floor of the living room. She made the correct animal noise for each block as she went along.

Her brother picked out the fabrics to frame each animal. I sewed, he ironed, and she finally fell asleep on the floor under the table with the sewing machine on it.

Brother and I got the top together during the nap of a now quiet little sister. She woke up just as the last rows of blocks were being sewn together. I decided that no border was necessary. Top was done.

Now to hand quilt it…

I should have just machine quilted this and been done, but I thought it would be fun to hand quilt. Why you ask? I can honestly say I have no idea.

Somehow, I came to the decision that the “Baptist Fan” would look great on this. The design looked great when complete, but marking it was awful. It seemed like every area of the quilt needed some different color of marking pencil.

The joy of putting in the last quilting stitch on this quilt !

The finished size was 31″ x 47″.

No wool batting for this quilt. Instead I used what was on hand – a left-over section of polyester batting. The binding was just a plain black cotton solid fabric.

By now, daughter had lost interest in farm animals and the sounds they make.

Complete…

I entered it in the local fair that summer. The quilt got second place with many comments about how “original” it was.

The Barnyard quilt made rare appearances at other quilt shows, and on my walls at home.

The quilt guild I belonged to was raffling quilted items off in 2002 to help a local organization. This fun quilt still looked new, and I added it to the pile of items that were being raffled. It was time for the quilt to go live at another home that would appreciate it.

Barnyard quilt completed.

Thoughts on donating…

As you read through this blog and my old one, you will discover that I truly believe quilts and quilting can be helpful in our own corner of the world. There are so many people who can use quilts.

The donated quilts do not need to be beautiful, or even bed size. They should be well made. Many people associate quilts with comfort, happy memories, or family.

For veterans, babies, or children, quilts are especially appreciated. Check around your own community: homeless shelters, veterans clinics, adoption agencies, crisis pregnancy centers, kindergartens, etc.

Donated quilts can be simple designs. Generally machine quilting or tied with yarn is acceptable.

If you prefer to make something more time consuming or involved, then an organization that is doing an auction or raffle may be the place to donate.

Most quilters I know say they have too many quilts, or too much fabric to use themselves. This is the way to give back.

Any day spent sewing....
PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

THANKFUL FOR ALREADY CUT STRIPS

THANKFUL FOR ALREADY CUT STRIPS
Basket Weave Nine Patch

I try to keep several containers of already cut pieces in various sizes on hand that I use a lot. Cutting as I have time keeps the scrap bins somewhat under control. And recently I have been so very thankful for already cut strips.

THANKFUL FOR ALREADY CUT STRIPS
One bin of cut 2.5″ scrap strips
Bin of 2.5" strips.
The colors are not separated, I sort through them when I decide what color to use.

Why I am thankful for already cut strips today

My shoulder caused problems during the first part of the year and was finally starting to heal and feel much better. On July 17 I was out at a local park. I was watching where I was going, not where I put my feet. Yep, you guessed it, the ground was uneven and I fell. No one has ever accused me of being graceful!

I am now in a brace to give my muscles and tendons a rest and time to heal. Severe sprains are no fun. It has really cut down on my quilting since I can’t hand quilt, use the rotary cutter, or lift much. Frustrating… but I am thankful for the already cut strips that eliminate that step.

My arm in a brace.

Spending time looking at quilt magazines and books is fun. I started out looking just to look and inspire, and ended up finding the “perfect” pattern for the two bins of cut 2.5″ strips.

THANKFUL FOR ALREADY CUT STRIPS
Source: Quilts! Quilts!! Quilts!!! The Complete Guide to Quiltmaking by D. McClun & L. Nownes

This pattern is a classic example of use the piece size you have on hand or want to cut. The directions call for smaller than my 2.5″ strips, but I am using the above photo as the starting point and will go my own way with it. I made a similar one years ago with different size blocks, sashing, and posts.

Sewing the strips TOGETHER:

I found strips that are close to the same length and sewed them together in groups of three length-wise. There is no rhyme to the colors as this is total scrap.

Especially with the current injury making it almost impossible to use the rotary cutter, I am thankful for already cut strips. Most of the three strip blocks were already sewn together which is another blessing at this point.

Iron all the seams. I measured across the three pieces and cut each three strip group the same size so now I have a square. Make the amount of these squares you need for your quilt top.

This is where I need to stop and say that I do all this sewing assembly line style. I just line up the fabrics and sew. When the pile starts getting in my way, I stop and cut them apart. Then I will grab more strips and assembly line sew again until I have the right amount.

I have kept the bin of strips beside the sewing machine for the past several weeks and sewed when I had a few minutes or hours. There is time tied up in this quilt, but it goes together easily. Another advantage of this quilt is that it is a great way to use those scraps.

Just keep sewing

Assembly line sewing is an easy and quick way to get through a pile of pieces. It also allows me to do a lot of ironing at a time. I sometimes make phone calls while ironing since I can put the phone on speaker. This allows me to get several things marked off my “to-do” list.

The original inspiration photo (above) goes together like my quilt at the start, but here I veer off in my own way. I sewed 9 of the blocks together to make a “basket weave” pattern (see below).

THANKFUL FOR ALREADY CUT STRIPS
Complete block is 17.5″ square

Sashing and posts:

I wanted to break up all the scraps with a solid color sashing. This beautiful turquoise/teal fabric was in my stash. All the fabric in this top was on hand already.

Sashing.
Sashing fabric

I like sashing to have “posts” because it is easier to keep the rows straight with each other (at least for me). The sashing is cut 3″ wide for posts because I have a box of 3″ squares left over from other projects. Another way to use up some already cut pieces.

3" squares to use as "posts".
3″ squares left over from other projects.

Measure your complete “basket weave blocks”. That will be the size of your sashing. Cut some or all at this point. I usually cut several to get started with, and then will count and cut more if needed.

This quilt top is 4 “basket weave” blocks by 4 “basket weave” blocks for a total of 16 blocks. I sew a sashing to one side of each block. This way there is sashing between the blocks. The last block in the row gets a sashing on the outside edge too. Complete the rows in this manner. Iron.

THANKFUL FOR ALREADY CUT STRIPS
Block with sashing between blocks, and a row of sashing with posts sewn to a row of blocks.

Cut more sashing strips the size needed. Sew a strip to a post. In my top this meant 4 sets of sashing and posts, plus one extra post sewn at the end. Iron.

Attach a row of sashing and posts to a row of blocks with sashing between matching the posts to the sashing between each “basket weave” block.

One row of blocks with sashing and posts.

This video is short and easy to follow for those of you who prefer things a bit more organized.

Border decisions:

Once all the blocks, sashing, and posts were sewn together, I need a border. In my mind borders serve two purposes: a frame for the quilt, and/or a way to make the top the size needed.

Top completed, but it needs borders.
Top done, but it needs borders.

Above photo is the completed top as of today. It is 80″ square.

I went back to the stash. After looking through several options, I decided on a narrow solid black border to frame the quilt. Then I will add some more strips around it to make it about 90″ square.

The remaining blue from the sashing will be the binding fabric.

Hopefully, I will get the border on the top yet this week, but at this point tonight my wrist is throbbing. It is time for ice and to rest my wrist.

Update 08/17/2021:

The top is complete !!

Borders are on. Finished size of top is 94″ square.

Narrow solid black border was cut 1.75″ wide.

The scrap strips used in the two rounds around the narrow black border are 2.5″ wide.

THANKFUL FOR ALREADY CUT STRIPS
All kinds of fun scraps in this top.

There is enough of the blue used for the sashing to make the binding after the top is machine quilted.

My tip to you:

When you can find or make the time, sort scraps or fabric from your stash. Cut these fabric pieces into common pieces and sizes you use frequently. Keep some on hand at all times.

They can make for a quick project, or are ready when the mood hits to just sit and enjoy the rhythm of sewing.

You will be thankful for already cut strips and squares.

Happy Quilting.

Make today amazing clip art.
Source: Bing clip art
PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

THE ANTIQUE HONEYCOMB QUILT

THE ANTIQUE HONEYCOMB QUILT

The Antique Honeycomb Quilt was a wonderful find during a visit to an antique shop in Farmersburg, IN during 1997. The top was in a pile of other antique tops back in a dark corner. I paid $15 for it, and happily took it home.

This quilt pattern is a bit different than “normal” because the honeycombs are more rectangular than hexagon.

I compared the fabrics to some other quilts I had. And did some research, including a visit with my aunt who specializes in antique quilts. We both decided it was probably made in the very early 1900’s. The range of fabrics is from the 1860’s to 1900.

Some of the browns are faded and starting to shred.

Brown fabric that is shredding.
Brown fabric that is shredding.

Please note that this quilt is not a charm quilt where each fabric is different. It is scrap with lots of repeated fabrics. Someone using what they had on hand at the time.

A note on old fabric:

The antique honeycomb quilt top really called out to me for attention and care. I very carefully and gently washed (really soaked) it in the bathtub (see Method 2 of this link). I did not wring it out or agitate it in any way, but there were problems even with this.

Some of the fabrics that were intact prior to washing started shredding. The flip side is that some of the fabrics stood up to the water just fine, and looked brighter.

Fragile old fabric is something to be aware of if you like antique textiles of any sort. The condition of the fabric will determine if it is for show or use.

Some basic research shows that if any metal was used in the dying or dye setting of a fabric, the fabric is much more likely to shred or deteriorate with time. This seems to occur more in the time period of the mid 1800s to early 1900s.

To hand quilt or not:

Even with some of the pieces shredding, I decided to hand quilt it. There are two reasons for this: I could keep the tension of the quilt frame loose enough to quilt but not put stress on the fabric. The top called out to be completed into a quilt.

This quilt had no border, and I chose to leave it the original size of 68″ x 74″.

Here is the antique looking fabric for the backing.

Backing fabric of the antique honeycomb quilt.
Backing

The hand quilting is a simple outline around each piece. I simply “eye-balled” the quilting. It looks uniform enough that I have been asked what I marked it with.

THE ANTIQUE HONEYCOMB QUILT

A simple solid red binding completed the quilt.

Most quilts that I make are intended to be used. This one is only for display. It looks very homey and comfortable.

Some quilters would replace the shredded pieces with reproduction fabric, but I chose to leave them there. It adds to the antique look and feel of this unusual quilt.

This quilt gets many comments from people who like antiques, and other quilters. It is an unusual block, the various fabrics, the backing, the hand stitching all combine to make for a conversation starter.

Honeycomb pieces.

Would I do it again?

I honestly do not know if I would take the time and care to hand quilt an antique quilt top again. This one spoke to me and I paid attention. It is a source of happiness for me every time I look at it.

The moral to this is to follow your heart when making a quilt. Enjoy the process. Pick fabrics and colors you enjoy. Use a technique you enjoy. There is no right or wrong to making a quilt for yourself.

Make today amazing
Source: Bing clip art
PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

SIMPLE CHRISTMAS TABLE TOPPER

Christmas tree clip art
Source: Bing clip art

Table toppers are easy and quick to make. It is such a nice feeling to make an entire quilted project quickly and have that wonderful warm feeling of “yeah, it is done”. That is how I feel about this Simple Christmas Table Topper.

SIMPLE CHRISTMAS TABLE TOPPER
Yippee!! It is complete.

Courthouse Steps pattern is a variation of the ever popular Log Cabin.

Making this Simple Christmas Table Topper:

Obviously the strips and center squares could be cut the size you need. But I used 2.5″ beige center blocks, and 1.75″ strips in green and red.

The front pieces were all from the scrap bin. The backing was a piece from the stash.

The blocks are super easy to piece. Sew a strip of one color (green) on the two parallel sides of the squares. Iron. Sew the other color (red) on the two parallel sides of the squares. Iron. Repeat until the block is the size you want.

The border I added was cut 4″ wide. I really like the cardinals and pine cones on it.

The border of the table topper.
Courthouse Steps border

For the machine quilting, I did straight lines along each row of blocks. Also along the borders. Simple and quick.

Polyester batting is great for this sort of project because it does not need to be closely quilted.

SIMPLE CHRISTMAS TABLE TOPPER
Courthouse Steps

The binding is a 2.5″ straight strip that is folded in half and ironed. I then sew it onto the front of the quilt. Yes, the corners are mitered. Please use whatever method of binding you want on your project.

I hand sewed the binding down on the back.

This Simple Christmas Table Topper is 34″ square. Finish it by adding a tag with at least initials and year. I use up scraps of Aida cloth from counted cross stitch projects for this.

Happy Quilting.

Holly clip art
Source: Bing clip art
PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN

A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN
Source: Bing clipart

I have always been ready to travel when the opportunity arises. Quilting and travel seem to fit together fine. So I am a quilter on the road again.

The hubby and I took a few days off to escape north to see my sister, her family, and any other family who showed up in MN. The plan was to make the drive each way a two day trip with overnights in the Wisconsin Dells.

Peaceful, quiet time…

The other part of the plan was simply to relax on the lake, enjoy no schedule, and have a great visit. The trip was great and the plans worked out fine.

The cabin deep in the north woods of MN.
The cabin deep in the north woods of MN
View of the lake from the cabin.
View of the lake from the cabin.
A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN
Time on the lake
Peaceful view
Peaceful view

Quilting by the lake

I am still dealing with a problem shoulder so chose a small project that is very mobile. It is also great to just pick up, work on, and put down. No stress.

All the fabric pieces in the small project bag was cut out prior to the trip. The bag also had needles, thread, and small scissors. This makes for keeping everything together, and does not take up much room in the suitcase.

A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN
Quilting project on this trip.
20 completed flower blocks
20 completed flower blocks
Muslin backing and paper removed from flower block
Muslin backing and paper removed from flower block

Fabric shopping to complete the trip

On the return trip, we made a stop in Hutchinson, MN. Hubby headed for the DQ down the block while I did a quick shopping spree at the wonderful store “Quilt Haven on Main”. If you are up that way, make time to stop at this fun fabric store.

Ok, I really don’t need any fabric, but I picked up a few pieces anyway.

Old timey prints
Old timey prints
A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN
Just fun prints.

A QUILER ON THE ROAD AGAIN…

Travel, peace and quiet, and quilting can go hand in hand. If you have a chance to do so please take the time away from your regular life and just enjoy. Pick a project that travels easy and work on it while relaxing.

Happy quilting.

Happy quilting. Make today amazing.
Source: Google clip art
PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

“UGLY FABRIC” (what should I do with it?)

Most of us quilters have come up against the problem of “ugly fabric” (what should I do with it?) After all, it followed me home.

It is just fine to describe a fabric as “ugly” – we are talking about an object. All of us have a different opinion of what we think of as beautiful vs. ugly fabric and there is no reason not to be honest. After all, if everyone liked the same colors and designs there would not be the selection of cloth that we currently have.

clip art - quilt block

The fabric looked great at the store, or quilt show… but now that it is home, I wonder what possessed me to pay good money for that.  And why did I think five yards would be enough? Am I losing my mind?

I have tried several ways of handling the “ugly fabric” issue in my own quilting world. So far, the two most used answers are cutting it up as small as possible or using it as the backing of a quilt (especially if I can donate it or give it away).

When I would complain to my grandmother about ugly fabric, she would smile big and tell me that I had “not cut it small enough”.  Good point, and it generally does work.

What to do with ugly fabric:

  1. Over-dye it which for me is a hit and miss method.  I have come out with a truly beautiful “new” fabric, and I have come out with something far worse than what I started with.
  2. Mix it with a lot of other scraps in a quilt and it won’t stand out.
  3. Donate it (Goodwill, art class at the school, 4-H, or the animal shelter for bedding, etc.).
  4. Trade it because someone else will probably love it and he/she has a chunk of fabric you just love.
  5. Sell it because you can use that money to buy a piece of fabric you like.
  6. Make a simple pet bed for the local animal shelter. This is basically a pillow case that I keep on the cutting table and stuff with left over snippets of batting and fabric. When 2/3 full, I sew the open side shut and off to the shelter it goes. The shelter here cannot get enough of them.

No doubt other quilters have their own solutions to this dilemma, and I wish you would share them with the rest of us.

clip art - bolts of fabric and scissors

I remember years ago using a specific line of fabric to make a quilt.  One of the fabrics was just too hideous (in my opinion) and when I brought the finished quilt back to the shop to show the ladies there, I said something about putting the ugliest fabric on the back.  The owner was totally offended and made sure I knew it.  My comment was thoughtless, but it was my honest opinion.

Ugly fabric is useable:

The point is not that the fabric is ugly, but that we find a way to use it.  In the world of recycle, reuse, and re-purpose, fabric should be used. It has not been many years ago that nothing was thrown away because the item was too expensive or too hard to get to waste. We have so many choices today in the fabric world that we forget how hard it was for our predecessors to get nice fabric. So, let’s find a use for it, if only in honor of the quilters who came before us.

Pioneer woman sitting on porch with quilt top

Some ideas for ugly fabric:

https://www.quiltinghub.com/Articles/ArticleID/66

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED
.

DONATED BABY QUILTS TO THE LOCAL CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTER

DONATED BABY QUILTS TO THE LOCAL CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTER

I am a big believer in giving back to my community. Here are six simple donated baby quilts to the local crisis pregnancy center that I made. As I make these quilts, they get donated in batches of 6 – 12 to two local pregnancy centers.

The blocks are a mix of flannel and cotton with the batting being scraps left over from my own projects. The backing is usually a flannel or child print cotton. They are tied with yarn. People know that I make many of these annually so many of the supplies are donated to me for this purpose.

Supplies For the Donated baby quilts:

Nine 9.5” cotton or flannel squares (3 rows of 3 squares each)

Batting

Bright colored yarn

Backing fabric (flannel or cotton – 1.25 yard)

At a minimum they should be tied at each corner and in the center of each block. They could be machine quilted easily in straight lines.

I do a self binding by trimming the batting even with the top, and then trimming the back to 2″ on each side larger than the top/batting. Fold the over hang in half once (so now 1″ wide all around quilt) and sew down as binding.

DONATED BABY QUILTS TO THE LOCAL CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTER

If using fleece as the backing, when self binding trim to 1″ and zig-zag stitch down. I have found if using fleece for the backing, I do not use batting.

Please remember that these donated baby quilts for the local crisis pregnancy center are meant to be loved to death, so make them well and colorful.

Reach out to others:

If you ask or look around your own community, there are people or places who would love to receive warm and cuddly quilts. These are also a simple way to teach people basic sewing skills.

In the past, I have used these quilts to teach basic sewing and giving skills to a group of teen girls at church. It was a fun way to learn and for them to socialize as well. Currently I am making the donated baby quilts alone as the girls have all left for college, and none of the current teen girls are interested in sewing.

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2015/02/10-crisis-pregnancy-quilts.html

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2014/09/19-crisis-pregnancy-center-quilts.html

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

LOST AT SEA QUILT

Lost at Sea quilt

This quilt started out simple enough as an Ocean Wave quilt. And then “disaster” struck and I ended up with this Lost at Sea quilt.

My daughter wanted a bright and cheery quilt. And as always I was happy to make a top that used lots of scraps from my overflowing scrap bin.

This pattern uses two sizes of triangles and normally goes together easily enough. I currently cannot find the old paper pattern from a magazine that I used (it may finally have been used to death), but this quilt pattern is very similar.

Due to the the small pieces, and large amount of pieces needed there is a real need for the time to work on it.

“Disaster strikes”

So how did I make this mistake on the Lost at Sea quilt? Lack of time and being over tired so I just did not catch my mistake. I pieced this top in 1997 and my kids were all under 12, and we were homeschooling.

The blocks went together individually just fine.

It was when I connected the blocks that the mistake happened. The blocks got turned around and ended up in a totally different design. Yes, it does resemble real ocean waves and we all liked the finished top.

At least the gray and pink striped border frames it beautifully.

Another view of Lost at Sea.
Canon Inc

Crisis avoided by laughing about it, and just renaming the quilt. This quilt was a favorite of my daughter’s and it is long worn out from being loved into nothing but rags.

The finished size was 68″ x 88″. It was machine quilted in an all over wavy pattern in 2000 by MG.

And finally…

I love this pattern and it makes beautiful quilts. So far, I have only made these in scraps but it would make a beautiful two color quilt. I am thinking about making a solid colored quilt – maybe like an Amish quilt with black or navy background.

I made the below Ocean Wave quilt in 1990. Here it is in a personal quilt show last spring. It still looks good.

Ocean Waves quilt in green, blue, purple, and gray.

Wherever your quilt journey takes you, enjoy the trip. Learn from it. Challenge yourself. Be happy.

Make today amazing.

PLEASE NOTE: 
ALL PHOTOS AND WRITTEN CONTENT ARE MY OWN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

The Mystery Quilt Continues

Mystery clip art
Source: Bing clip art

I decided to do the mystery quilt that Bonnie Hunter put out on her blog during late November 2020. My goal was to complete each part as the directions came out every week. Real life put out some bumps and I am behind, so the mystery quilt continues…..

If you missed my previous post on this mystery quilt, please go here. In that post, I showed photos as I completed making parts 1 – 6.

I am not going to give details or sizes because you should to go to Bonnie’s website to get the complete directions. At some point this design will be put into a PDF pattern she will sell.

Fall color leaves
Source: Bing clip art

And the mystery quilt continues…..

Now I am in part 7 which is putting the components from the previous parts into blocks and sashing to complete the top for making the Grassy Creek Mystery Quilt.

The Main Blocks:

The first step in this part was making these Ohio Star blocks to be the center of the main blocks.

Ohio Stars for the center of the mystery quilt blocks.

Then adding the triangle components to the sides.

Adding triangle components to sides.

So the center block is complete. There is still the sashing and secondary blocks to make from the parts.

Main blocks of mystery quilt.

The sashing:

Sewing the gray strips together to make the sashing was easy but to me the most time consuming part of the entire process. For part 7 the red rectangles were added to each long end.

Sashing for mystery quilt blocks.

The final components to put together are the remaining flying geese blocks, HST, and red rectangles into a secondary block. This is where I am as of this morning – still needing to add the yellow and gray HST:

A section of part 7.

When I committed to doing this mystery quilt, I involved another quilter who had never done anything by Bonnie Hunter or a mystery quilt. She was not sure about it but was willing. Her top has been completed for 3 weeks because she had way too much fun using scraps and piecing an unknown design.

That being said, for those of us who get bogged down in a design, someone else just flies through it and is done. Usually other quilters say that I am the one flying through the piecing of a quilt top – not this time.

So….just keep at your project, enjoy, and complete. I have not given up or allowed myself to work on another quilt top. This one will not be a UFO.

QUILTING BOOKS FOR TINY SCRAPS

Quilting Books for Tiny Scraps – I am not really sure how it happens, but I start with one shelf for quilting books and pretty soon they have taken over two. I recently decided that some weeding and/or organizing of these books was necessary. Doing this actually forces me to really look at the books – which can be a distraction because then I start thinking “I could do this quilt, or this one…….” And sometimes I even wonder what in the world I was thinking when I brought a book home.

Over the past 2 or 3 years, I have been trying to use up my scraps and also my stash.  These two books have wonderful patterns or ideas that I have based a couple scrap quilts on. They have patterns from easy to expert.  They are “keepers” for my personal library.

Another great book for small and tiny scraps.
QUILTING BOOKS FOR TINY SCRAPS

I was asked how I get books with spiral bindings.  After purchasing, I take the books to the local copy shop. There they cut off the binding and put on this spiral binding.  I like my quilt books this way because they lay flat when I am working on a project.  The cost is very reasonable – generally about $2-3 each book.

I truly encourage quilters to collect quilt books that are helpful to you, whether it is techniques, patterns, or inspiration. There are so many wonderful quilting books out there to choose from. We don’t need all the books, but building our own reference library of books that help us as quilters is a great boost to our quilting journey.

https://indianaquilter40.com/three-favorite-quilting-books/

https://indianaquilter40.blogspot.com/2019/06/more-books.html